Discussion Prompts:

What do you think the subject of this photograph is thinking about or feeling?
Have you ever felt how they look?
Describe some of the objects you see in the room.
Describe some of the objects in your own room.
Do those objects reflect who you are?
The artist titled this photograph "The Last Page." How do you think this person feels about reaching the last page of the book?
Do you remember having a strong reaction when coming to the end of a book? What book was it, and why did you feel that way?

Caleb Cole, The Last Page, From the series “Other People’s Clothes,” 2008

Activity Instructions (Ages 5-8):

Draw a self portrait. In the background draw objects that represent you as a person. Use your favorite colors and shapes to represent what you love and who you are.

Alternate Activity (Ages 9-13):

The artist’s series of work that includes this photograph is called “Other People’s Clothes.” What do you think this series was about? Think about what makes you an individual. Cut out photos from old magazines or newspapers that express your personality, and create a collage all about you. Draw a self portrait and put it in your collage.

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork

Discussion Prompts:

Describe what you see happening in this image.
What do you think this woman is drawing?
Have you ever taken an art class? What did you learn?
What can you learn from copying the style of another artist?
What else do you see happening in the background that you find curious?

Winslow Homer, Art Students and Copyists in the Louvre Gallery, Paris, 1868

Activity Instructions (Ages 5-9):

Study this image and think about the discussion prompts with a partner. Talk about the way the work is made, and the people and scenery you see. After a few minutes, cover the image and try to recreate the artwork from your memory. When you’re finished compare the two and see what you remembered from the artwork and what you may have missed.

Alternate Activity (Ages 10-15):

Study the image carefully and directly copy it as best as you can. Pay attention to the lines, perspective and shading. Use materials that you think best capture the wood engraving’s qualities. Try pencils, pens or charcoal if you have them available.

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork

Discussion Prompts:

Describe what you see happening in this photograph.
Looking at this photograph, how does it make you feel?
This photograph is titled “Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream;” what do you think the subject may be dreaming about?
How does knowing the title of this photograph change what you think about the subject?
A dream can refer to your subconscious thoughts at night, or goals and hopes you have for the future. What are some dreams you have?

Jesse Burke, Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream, From the series “Wild and Precious”, 2012

Activity Instructions (Ages 9-13):

Make a mixed media collage about your dreams. Draw your most recent dream, then find interesting objects around your house, like colorful bottle caps, popsicle sticks, ribbons or empty paper towel rolls. Incorporate these items into your drawing.

Alternate Activity (Ages 4-8):

Think about the last good dream you had. Using markers and crayons, draw the main character from that dream. Talk to a family member about what happened in the dream, and what the character looked and acted like.

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork

Discussion Prompts:

Describe what is happening in this painting.
What do you think the four people could be talking about?
What do their faces express?
What do you think happened before this part of the story? What do you see that makes you say that?
Does this image of a backyard look like your backyard? How are they similar or different?
What medium do you think this piece of artwork is? What type of materials may the artist have used to create this image?
Which of these four people do you most relate to today? Why?

Bob Dilworth, Backyard, 2014, Acrylic, oil, acrylic base spray paint, paint markers and paper on canvas, Partial gift of Dr. Joseph A. Chazan; partial museum purchase, 2016.006.001

Activity Instructions (Ages 5-12):

In this painting the artist used different types of paint mixed together to achieve the end result. Try to mimic this style with glue art. Draw a scene of your own backyard with simple lines and shapes on construction paper. Using glue, trace the pencil lines. Once the glue is dry color in your drawing with chalk, colored pencils, markers, or other mediums to create different effects on different parts of the drawing.

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork

Discussion Prompts:

What do the colors in this painting evoke?
How does this painting make you feel?
What do you see in the landscape of this painting?
This painting was painted in the 1800’s. Can you find a similar landscape in 2020? Where?
How do you think the natural world has changed since the artist painted this scene?
Have you ever seen a sunset with colors as intense as the colors in this painting? Do you remember how it felt to see something like that in nature?

George Inness, Sunset/Change (Autumn Section), 1861, Oil on canvas, Bequest of Miss Elizabeth H. Swinburne, 26 in x 35 3/4 inches, 1919.002.001

Activity Instructions (Ages 5-8):

Create your own representation of a sunset. Look up what time the sunset is tonight and view it from your backyard, a park, the beach, or your window. Glue pieces of colorful tissue paper or construction paper to another piece of paper. Use lots of bright colors and fill the whole page with color, like in this painting. Then draw in some plants, animals, trees or other scenery in a dark marker to make silhouettes in the landscape. How does your landscape look different from George Inness’?

Alternate Activity (Ages 9-13):

Being stuck inside changes your everyday landscapes. What does your current landscape look like? Draw your surroundings and focus on a place that brings you comfort and peace. Talk to your family about how you can find places like this each day without being able to travel to new interesting places.

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork

Discussion Prompts:

What do you see in this image?
What do you think this artwork is made of?
Have you ever seen stained glass before? What did you think of it when you saw it?
This piece is titled "Trompe L’Oeil Curtain." Trompe l’oeil is a term to describe visual illusion in art particularly when an artist creates a painting in a way that makes objects look three-dimensional. Why do you think John LaFarge titled his work this way?

John La Farge, Trompe L’Oeil Curtain, 1882-1884, Leaded opalescent glass, Gift of Stephen J. Warner, 1995.004.001

Activity Instructions (Ages 5-8):

Create your own stained glass artwork. For this activity you will need wax paper, colored tissue paper or construction paper and a mixture of water and glue. Take a piece of wax paper and paint it with your glue mixture. Rip up or cut out shapes from your tissue paper and cover the wax paper. You can make an abstract stained glass or create a scene. As you place the paper pieces onto the wax paper brush more of the glue mixture on top. When you’re done creating your artwork let it dry completely and then hang it in a sunny window.

Alternate Activity (Ages 9-15):

Research some other artists that have used the effect of trompe l’oeil in their artwork. Think about how perspective can make architectural or other elements feel like they are real or coming out of the painting. Try to recreate a drawing or painting you researched, practicing the trompe l’oeil effect.

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork

Discussion Prompts:

Describe what you see happening in this drawing.
What are the children doing?
What do you think the children in this drawing are thinking or feeling? Can you remember a time you felt this way?
Compare this scene to your day today. Were there times when you were in a similar situation?
What art materials did the artist use to create this drawing?
Does the artist’s drawing technique make this image hard to decipher? Why? Why do you think the artist might have wanted to create this ambiguity?

George Bellows, Children on the Porch, 1919, Charcoal and graphite pencil on beige wove thin machine-made paper with Natoma cursive watermark along outer margins, Museum Purchase, 2012.011.001

Activity Instructions (Ages 4-8):

Using chalk, crayons or pencils draw a few different scenes of what you did today. Try to mimic the style of this drawing. Compare your drawings to George Bellows work.

Alternate Activity (Ages 9-15):

Think of something that you did today or something that happened during your day. Start drawing it. Create your entire drawing with a single continuous line. Do not lift the pencil off the page until you are done with your drawing. How does this technique differ from George Bellows’ drawing technique? How is it similar?

Investigate - Plan - Make

Creating - Allow free time for children to try out different mediums and techniques based on their own self-direction
Presenting - Once you have a completed art project, think about having your kids present them after dinner or at some other down time
Responding - Explore art online at different museums and practice talking about art
Connecting - Connect art to your other schoolwork